Worries About Foremilk and Hindmilk By Nancy Mohrbacher

A little knowledge can be a dangerous thing.  This has never been so true as in the ongoing debate about foremilk and hindmilk and their impact on breastfeeding.  The misunderstandings around these concepts have caused anxiety, upset, and even led to breastfeeding problems and premature weaning.

The 2003 edition of The Breastfeeding Answer Book defines these terms this way:

“The milk the baby receives when he begins breastfeeding is called the ‘foremilk,’ which is high in volume but low in fat.  As the feeding progresses, the fat content of the milk rises steadily as the volume decreases. The milk near the end of the feeding is low in volume but high in fat and is called the ‘hindmilk’” (Mohrbacher and Stock, p. 34).

It goes on to explain that by simply letting the baby “finish the first breast first”—switching breasts when the baby comes off the breast on his own rather than after a set time—the mother can be sure her baby receives the “proper balance of fluid and fat.”  Since this book was published, research has expanded our understanding of foremilk and hindmilk and answered many of the common questions mothers have about these concepts.

Full Article HERE

Is baby ready for solid foods? (What do the experts say?)

By: Kellymom.com

Health experts and breastfeeding experts agree that it’s best to wait until your baby is around six months old before offering any food other than breastmilk. There has been a large amount of research on this, and most health organizations have updated their recommendations to agree with current research. Unfortunately, many health care providers and written materials are not up to date in what they are advising parents.

Following are just a few of the organizations that recommend that all babies be exclusively breastfed (no cereal, juice or any other foods) for the first 6 months of life (not the first 4-6 months):

Most babies will become developmentally and physiologically ready to eat solid foods between 6 and 8 months of age.

Why wait until 6 months for solids?

Although many of the reasons listed here assume that your baby is breastfed or fed breastmilk only, experts generally recommend that solids be delayed for formula fed babies also.

Full article here

Picture: Instagram

Custom Made Milk

If you breastfeed at your child’s daycare, you are breathing in and touching the germs in this environment. Your baby’s saliva also sends information through the breast about what he/she has come in contact with which in turn tells your body to make milk to protect against any nasty germs at that daycare. AMAZING right?!

If you live in Oakland and take BART to work in the City, you are making Oakland/BART/San Francisco milk! If you live and work in Union City, CA, you are making custom Union City, CA milk based on your environment! [hometown shot out :-)]